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Fiber-Optic Solutions with Induction Heating

soldering glass feedthroughs

Manufacturers of fiber optic materials and assemblies are searching for a faster, more consistent, highly accurate heat source for ferrule soldering, hermetic sealing, epoxy curing, fiber drawing and other heating processes.

Induction Benefits

  • Short Heat Cycles
  • Low Temperatures
  • Pinpoint Accuracy
  • No Impurities
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Curing Epoxy On A Laser Diode Assembly
Melting Glass For Fiber Drawing
Soldering Glass Feed-throughs in a Kovar Fiber Optic Housing
Soldering A Gold-Plated Ferrule to a Fiber Optic Cable
Soldering a Ferrule to a Fiber Optic Cable (Hermetic Sealing)


You can use our induction technology to heat very small areas with pinpoint accuracy.

Fast heating times and temperatures below 500°F are preferred for fiber optic soldering due to the heat-sensitive nature of the components. It is difficult to achieve these desired results with resistance heating and hot air (the two most commonly used heating methods) and neither of these can be easily automated for high speed production.


Solid state induction heating offers exciting possibilities for manufacturers of fiber optic components. With the proper coil design, induction heat is highly selective, able to target small areas with pinpoint accuracy. Heating cycles are normally reduced to just a few seconds, depending on the application. Since there is no hot air to transmit impurities and the parts never come in direct contact with the heating coil, induction is an amazingly clean source of heat for hermetic sealing. And with the appropriate fixturing, the entire process can be automated for maximum speed and consistency.

Ameritherm's advanced induction technology provides precision ±2°F temperature control and is easily adaptable for a variety of solder materials. Our compact, lightweight EASYHEAT systems generally produce more than enough heat to quickly solder component-size parts at temperatures below 500°F.